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Chinese Without Tears for Beginners • Stewart/Lucca | Discovery Publisher
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Chinese Without Tears
for Beginners

Chinese without Tears for Beginners

Brian Stewart & Adriano Lucca

12

LESSONS

40

EXERCISES

200

CHARACTERS

``Chinese without Tears for Beginners`` is the first volume of the ``Chinese without Tears`` series. It is recommended for absolute beginners. No prior knowledge of Pinyin or Chinese characters is required for learners studying this textbook.

Chinese without Tears for Beginners is the first volume of the Chinese without Tears series. It is recommended for absolute beginners. No prior knowledge of Pinyin or Chinese characters is required for learners studying this textbook.

  • Step by step, Chinese without Tears for Beginners gives students the strong foundation that is required to start learning, efficiently, the Chinese language.
  • Using an originally designed repetition method and through a large number of exercises, Chinese without Tears for Beginners will make you never forget 200+ Chinese characters along with their structure, meaning, and sound.
  • And, to make sure that it sticks, using what you have learned, you will read a short story written in Chinese, and translate it into English.
Chinese Without Tear for Beginners - Brian Stewart & Adriano Lucca
Chinese Without Tear for Beginners - Brian Stewart & Adriano Lucca

Lesson One

  • Jumping in at the shallow end
  • List of Chinese characters #1 – #27
  • Introduction
  • Practice
  • Lesson One: Test 1
  • Lesson One: Test 2
  • How to write Chinese characters
    • Stroke Types
    • Stroke Order
    • Component Order
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Two

  • The formation of Chinese characters
    • Pictographs
    • Ideographs
    • Combinations
    • Radicals
    • Examples of common radicals
  • Lesson Two: Test 1
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Three

  • Evolution of Chinese characters
  • List of Chinese characters #28 – #52
  • Lesson Three: Stroke Order & Practice
  • Lesson Three: Test 1
  • Lesson Three: Test 2
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Four

  • Simplified and Traditional Chinese
  • List of Chinese characters #53 – #76
  • Lesson Four: Stroke Order & Practice
  • Lesson Four: Test 1
  • Lesson Four: Test 2
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Five

  • Looking up Chinese characters in a Chinese Dictionary
    • By Radicals
    • By Stroke Count
    • By Sound
  • List of Chinese characters #77 – #99
  • Lesson Five: Stroke Order & Practice
  • Lesson Five: Test 1
  • Lesson Five: Test 2
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Six

  • Are “characters”, “words”?
  • List of Chinese characters #100 – #130
  • Lesson Six: Stroke Order & Practice
  • Lesson Six: Test 1
  • Lesson Six: Test 2
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Seven

  • Chinese Idioms
  • List of Chinese characters #131 – #156
  • Lesson Seven: Stroke Order & Practice
  • Lesson Seven: Test 1
  • Lesson Seven: Test 2
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Eight

  • The Chinese Zodiac and the use of “animal” radical
  • Lesson Eight: Stroke Order & Practice
  • Lesson Eight: Test 1
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Nine

  • Dialects, sounds, spelling and borrowings for phonetic reasons
  • Introduction
  • Discussion
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Lesson Ten

  • The function of sound in the Chinese written language
  • The tone system
  • Do characters with similar radicals or structure have similar sound and/or meaning?
  • Practical Chinese Corner

Practical Chinese

  • Your first story in Chinese
  • The hardest language in the world?
  • Further reading

Final Tests

  • Final Test 1: Writing
  • Final Test 2: Meaning
  • Final Test 3: Radicals
  • Final Test 4: Pinyin

Appendix

  • List of characters by meaning
  • List of characters by number of strokes
  • List of 214 Kangxi radicals
  • Test Answer Key 1
  • Test Answer Key 2

Brian Stewart lived in China for twenty years, where he studied Chinese language. He now lives in England, where he writes books on the Chinese language.

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